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Counties with More Public Lands See Highest Growth in State

by Tim Hart

According to a report released by Headwaters Economics, counties with large amounts of public lands have been seeing higher economic growth than counties without. Luckily, Gallatin County is among the leaders in both public land and a fast growing economy.

Gallatin County had the highest rate of population growth from 2003 to 2012 and it drew more than 18,000 new residents during that time. The Headwaters report pointed to the quality and quantity of public lands as a big reason for the growth.

The report found that nearly two thirds of the growth in per capita personal income came from only 7 counties in Montana. Gallatin County was among them, but the correlation suggests that the public land in and around the county may actually be what is attracting new residents, businesses and money. This past summer, Yellowstone National Park has seen higher summer visitation rates. State Parks also saw a sharp rise in attendance.

Montana industries also took a noteworthy shift from mining, manufacturing and forestry and have shifted towards real estate, technical and professional service jobs. Higher paid and higher paying professionals are coming to the valley in a big way. The growth of real estate shows that people are buying and selling homes at an increased rate. As more people are becoming agents, that only shows how many out of staters have their eye on Montana.

 

Source: http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/economy/montana-gallatin-county-reaping-benefit-of-public-lands/article_33796fee-6c0f-580d-b3ae-45d5370464cc.html

 

Bozeman Becoming a Ski Hub for Nation, World

by Tim Hart

Bozeman, Montana has fast become a winter sports haven for the nation and even the world. Within the last two months, Bozeman has seen major steps forward in both its Alpine and Nordic ski reputation.

Bozeman was honored by National Geographic as one of the top 25 best ski towns in the world. That’s right, not the nation, but the world.

Bozeman shared the honor with towns such as Whistler, Canada; Chamonix France; Cortina d’Ampezzo, Italy; Aspen, Colorado; and Zermatt, Switzerland.

According to National Geographic, Bozeman stood out as the adventure capital of the Northern Rockies. The magazine enjoyed the working town feel of Bozeman, as oppose to other ski resort towns.

But Bozeman still offers the best of both worlds, with its two very different ski areas. Bridger Bowl, the non-profit, local ski area with its intense vertical and the famous Ridge offers a more day-to-day feel. Big Sky, on the other hand, offers the family vacation route, wining and dining its patrons every step of the way.

National Geographic also pointed to Bozeman’s surrounding mountains. Places like Hyalite also offer great winter activities like skiing, snow-shoeing, hiking and ice climbing.

In other news, Bozeman’s Nordic reputation may fast improve, thanks to the hard work of passionate locals. This past month, a non-profit organization called the Bridger Biathlon Club has reached two agreements to buy both the Crosscut Ranch and Bohart Ranch Cross Country Ski Center. The organization plans on building a world-class Nordic Ski venue designed to attract everyone from locals to Olympic athletes.

The Bridger Biathlon Club bought Bohart Ranch Cross Country Ski Center with the intention of continuing and expanding its Nordic operations. The organization has also signed a 3-year lease and purchase agreement for the nearby Crosscut Ranch with Jackson Financial Group. Jackson Financial Group had purchased the 259-acre ranch in a March auction. Over the past 25 years, the Crosscut Ranch could have had many different futures. At one point, the ranch had been on the track towards becoming a 2,500-unit subdivision.

Now, with both areas combined, the new cross country ski area will become one of the better cross country areas around, with more than 500 acres of total land. The Bridger Biathlon Club hopes to raise 10 million dollars by Nov. 15th 2017 to finalize the purchase and improve the surrounding infrastructure.

The biathlon club has already installed the newest, highest quality biathlon range at Bohart to make the area into a state-of-the-art training facility for high performing athletes. Biathlon combines cross-country skiing with target shooting and the sport has seen a rise in popularity due to its recent exposure in Olympic broadcasts. The range at Bohart has 12 Olympic targets and two Paralympic targets. 

After all the upgrades are completed, the cross-country ski area is on track to become a world class training facility, making the rocky west a much more viable option for Olympic winter sport training.

Now, with talks of a new, premier ice climbing/event center potentially being built at the Fairgrounds, coupled with the town’s recent indoctrination into the Ice Climbing World Cup circuit, Bozeman seems fast on its way to becoming the snow and ice sport capital of the Northwest.

The Bridger Canyon will now have Bridger Bowl and the new cross-country ski area literally a ski run away from each other (though probably an alpine one!). Coupled with Bozeman’s access to Big Sky and West Yellowstone, its hard not to see why Bozeman’s winter sport reputation has grown. Such a reputation can do a lot to attract visitors, athletes, students and families. Those looking to move to Bozeman may now be persuaded to make the plunge, now finding the area surrounded by such activity and buzz around winter sports.

 

Source: http://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/outdoors/bohart-ranch-crosscut-ranch-sold/article_8e1bcc88-7320-11e4-8940-7b60e3defb3d.html

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/best-ski-towns-photos/#/bozeman-montana-ski_47301_600x450.jpg

https://bozemanicetower.wordpress.com/

http://www.theuiaa.org/events-111-Bozeman-UIAA-Ice-Climbing-World-Cup-Montana-United-States-2014.html

 

Trees can add a lot to any property. Most times, homeowners are not thinking about the addition of dollar bills to their wallet when they are looking to landscape a home. However, planting trees in a well thought out manner can save a homeowner a lot of money in the future, while adding value to his/her property.

Trees can provide economic benefits, helping surround your home and keep warmth in during the winters. According to the US Department of Energy, homeowner’s who landscape for energy efficiency can expect a return on investment in under 8 years. A well landscaped outside can add thousands to the value of a home. Sometimes it’s more about the initial impression of a home that drives a sale, rather than its form and function. Trees can also reduce soil erosion around the home, keeping it that much safer if any natural disaster or similar event took place.

Northwest Energy provides some great tips and tricks to plant trees effectively for your property. I’ve added the ones that stuck out to me below:

1. Choose a tree that’s appropriate for your climate and space.

2.Plan where you plant. Homeowners should make sure to consider the entire life-span of a tree when they plant. Northwest energy states that on average you should plant trees 15 to 20 feet from your home and powerlines. Trees that grow taller than 40 feet should be planted at least 35 feet away. A misplanted tree could damage your siding, roof, or windows in the future when it grows too big and rubs against the home.

3. Trimming is a homeowner’s responsibility, but any homeowner can still call Northwest Energy and they will stop by to make sure it is safe.

4. Call 811 for underground utility lines at least 2 days before you dig and plant at least 25 feet from such lines.

Trees add initial home value but they can also take away from future expenses. They’re always a pretty addition to a home’s exterior and, of course, they keep our oxygen fresh and our water pure. What’s not to love about them? With a little planning, any homeowner can be adding value to their property with a few tall, green additions outside.

 

Sources: http://www.northwesternenergy.com/safety-reliability/safety/trees-together

http://www.kbzk.com/news/northwestern-energy-volunteers-plant-trees-in-bozeman/

Off-Leash Dog Park Coming to Bozeman

by Tim Hart

A new dog park will be coming to Bozeman. The park will provide off-leash options, which is even better news for dog owners. The new park will be located at Rocky Creek Farm off of Frontage Road. Starting today, owners will be able to visit the fully fenced 2-acre park. The 2-acre park will allow for dogs off leash and is only the first phase in an effort to create a much larger dog park with both off leash and on-leash options. Soon, new trails will be created that will provide dog owners with on-leash hiking options as well. The park is now accessible thanks to West Paw Design, who finished installing a new bridge, opening up access to the park. West Paw Design also chipped in $6,000 worth of fencing and other small projects to get the dog park starting strong. Dog owners can now look forward to another beautiful park to take their dogs. Having a park with off-leash access will also provide the dogs with a fun, friendly environment to meet other dogs and not be constantly on-leash in public. Having a dog in the home has become even more worry free in Bozeman with this additional dog park, providing a place for home owners to get their dogs out of the house and burning some of that seemingly never ending dog energy.

August Gallatin Valley Home Statistics

by Tim Hart

Last month, we focused on activity in the Gallatin County for condo/townhomes. This month, we will highlight rising prices for all homes in the Gallatin County.

Here are a few stats

  • The average price of a single-family residence raised from $364,736 in 2013 to $402,370 currently, a $37,634 increase.
  • The median price also rose from $279,500 in 2013 to $295,000, a $15,500 increase.
  • The average price of a condo/townhome raised from $236,544 in 2013 to $282,109 currently, an increase of $45,565.
  • The median price of these homes also raised from $175,000 in 2013 to $200,000 currently, an increase of $25,000.

Summary – based on these consistent price increases for single-family residences, condominiums and townhomes, the 2014 market continues to improve the value of homes in the Gallatin Valley.

Displaying blog entries 1-5 of 5