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Cheaper to Buy Than Rent? In Most Cities, 'Yes'


Cheaper to Buy Than Rent? In Most Cities, 'Yes'

Americans in 39 of the country’s 50 largest cities are finding it’s cheaper to buy a home than rent one, according to Trulia’s second quarter Rent vs. Buy index. In its index, Trulia compared the cost of buying and renting a two-bedroom apartment, condo, or town home in the 50 largest cities in the country.

When compared to the previous quarter, buying a home has become even more affordable than renting. Trulia found last quarter that in 72 percent of the cities it was better to buy than rent, but this quarter the number has grown to 78 percent of the cities studied.

Rising rents, falling home prices, and low mortgage rates have made home ownership make more financial sense in most areas of the country, according to Trulia.

"With home prices nearing a double dip and more foreclosures expected to flood the housing market over the next two years, the decision between renting and buying a home across most of the country has clearly moved in favor of buying," said Ken Shuman, Trulia's spokesperson, in a statement.

The cities where renting was a less costly option than home ownership were in New York, Fort Worth, Texas, and Kansas City, Mo.

Where It’s Cheapest to Buy vs. Rent

The following is a list of the top 12 cities where it’s cheapest to buy a home than rent.

1. Las Vegas
2. Phoenix
3. Arlington, Texas
4. Fresno, Calif.
5. Miami
6. Mesa, Ariz.
7. Jacksonville, Fla.
8. Sacramento, Calif.
9. Detroit
10. Omaha, Neb.
11. San Antonio
12. El Paso, Texas

Source: “Trulia Reveals Trend Towards Homeownership Where Affordability to Buy Versus Rent Extends to Almost Four in Five Major U.S. Cities,” (April 28, 2011)

New-Home Sales Gain Momentum

by Associated Press

 New-Home Sales Gain Momentum

After three straight months of declines, sales of new homes got a boost last month, jumping 11 percent, according to the Commerce Department’s latest new-home sales report released Monday.

New-home sales rose in March to a seasonally adjusted rate of 300,000 homes, up from February’s 250,000. However, the number is still far from what economists view as a healthy 700,000-a-year pace for the sector.

The median price of a new home increased 3 percent from February to $213,800. New-home prices are about 34 percent higher than the median price of existing homes, according to economists.

Regionally, new-home sales saw the biggest boost in the Northeast, jumping nearly 67 percent in March. The West saw an increase in new-home sales last month by nearly 26 percent; the Midwest posted a 13 percent increase; and in the South, new-home sales dipped 0.6 percent.

The new-home market continues to be battered by a high number of foreclosures that continue to dampen home prices across the country. With 1.2 million foreclosures forecast this year, the new-home sales market may not see a major turnaround for years, according to RealtyTrac Inc.

However, while residential construction has decreased considerably in recent years, reports have recently shown building permits have increased 28 percent for apartment and condo buildings.

Source: “The number of people who bought new homes jumped 11 pct., but pace is far below healthy level,” Associated Press (April 25, 2011)

Analysts say housing in on way up!

by Jon Prior - Monday Morning Cup of Coffee - Housing

Daily Real Estate News  |  April 25, 2011  |  Housing on the Way Up 

Analysts at both Standard & Poor's and Barclays Capital agree that the uptick in home resales last month is a favorable sign of things to come. Because pending home sales — an indicator of future activity — were up in February, S&P believes transaction volume will rise for April.

Barclays, meanwhile, says March's 3.7 percent gain in existing-home sales merely reinforces its position that the housing market actually hit bottom in late 2010.

Source: “Monday Morning Cup of Coffee,” Housing Wire, Jon Prior (04/25/11)

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