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Record-breaking Research at MSU in 2017

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Montana State University, the largest in the state with a whopping 16,440 students enrolled last fall, has set a record of $130.8 million in contract expenditures and research for the fiscal year that ended in June 2017. This impressive number is up $12 million from last year.

Researchers from the university pursued grant funding in the fiscal year 2017 more heavily than they have in the past. Here are the stats:

Fiscal Year 2017

Grant applications: 1,729 (>100 from fiscal year 2016)

New grant awards: 562

Total worth: $75.5 million (>8% more than fiscal year 2016)

What Does It Take to Get a Grant?

The commitment to academic research at MSU is apparent by the number of submitted proposals, especially because the entire process is anything but easy. It all begins with an idea, and from there a cycle of writing, budget development and research question generation follows.

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Both students and scientists that received these grants study in fields that include biochemistry, health, physics and the environment. The College of Letters and Science was credited $22.2 million, the College of Agriculture was credited $19.4 million and the College of Engineering received $17 million. The remainder was divided amongst a wide variety of projects, some of which included research on sustainable biofuels, health disparities in tribal communities and immunology and infectious diseases.

Although Fall 2017 enrollment numbers will be unavailable for several more weeks, it’s safe to say that the university is expecting to break last year’s record. With MSU continually breaking its record for enrolled students, it isn’t outlandish to predict that with more students comes more opportunity for larger grant award numbers in years to come. 


Related Articles: 

MSU Students Design "Small Shelters" For The Homeless

 

The Heroic Story Behind Chief Joseph Highway

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Chief Joseph Scenic Byway, also known as Wyoming Highway 296, is a beautiful drive through the Absaroka Mountains and Dead Indian Pass. It’s about a 46-mile drive in northern Park County, and is views worth a cruise for a weekend trip. However, this highway is more than just some scenic road, it has a great story behind its name.

Fleeing several hundred U.S. army soldiers led by General Howard during the Nez Perce War in 1877, Chief Joseph bravely led 700 men, women, and children on this road through Yellowstone Park and into the Absaroka Mountains. General Samuel D. Sturgis and 600 cavalries attempted to intercept the Nez Perce at the base of the Absaroka Mountains, where they believed the Indians would break out into the Great Plains. Fortunately for the Nez Perce, their scouts went ahead and spotted the soldiers from about six miles away.

Chief Joseph cleverly fooled the army by running their horses in a circle to kick up dust and mislead Sturgis that they were heading south, while they headed north through thick forest into the Dead Indian Gulch. The bait work brilliantly. Once Sturgis and his soldiers took the bait rode south to Shoshone, Chief Joseph and his tribe came back out of the Gulch and on to the Great Plains, unchallenged.

While they cleverly won about a 50-mile head start, Sturgis eventually caught on and quickly turned around. He joined forces with General Howard’s army, and together they followed Chief Joseph’s tracks. The U.S. army finally cornered and defeated the Nez Perce at the Battle of Bear Paw about a month later.

Related Articles:

How Did the City of “Bozeman” Get Its Name?

The Interesting History Behind Bozeman Street Names

Source:

Chief Joseph Scenic Byway

Nez Perce War

About the views:

Chief Joseph Scenic Highway

The Interesting History Behind Bozeman Street Names

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Established in peak times of the Gold Rush, Bozeman, Montana has an interesting background with some extraordinary founders. Much of Bozeman’s roads were named in honor of individuals who were monumental to the town’s success.

Here are few meaningful road names in Bozeman with an interesting history.

 

Bozeman Avenue

The city founder, John Bozeman, left his family behind to travel west in his quest for gold. He failed to find gold, so he took on a different venture—trail blazing. He guided wagon trains on the Bozeman Trail to Virginia City. Mr. Bozeman was a risk-taking gambling man. He embraced the dangers of breaking treaties with local Indian tribes by traveling through their territory.

Admiring the landscape of the Gallatin Valley, he eventually settled and began his most instrumental work in 1864—building the city of Bozeman. With help of his two partners, William J. Beall and Daniel Elliott Rouse, he built the first log homes, church, and school.

Unfortunately, he didn’t live long enough to see his city prosper. In 1867, at age 32, he was found murdered along the Yellowstone River. While the Blackfeet Indians were originally blamed for his murder, rumors have spread that his partner, Thomas Cover, had motive to murder him as a jealous husband. Historians even suspected that a henchman was hired to kill Mr. Bozeman on behalf of Nelson Story, the richest man in Bozeman. There is still no physical evidence to prove who the true killer was.

 

Beall Street

William J. Beall helped build the first church and school in Bozeman. Mr. Beall met John Bozeman and Daniel Rouse on his way to sell potatoes to gold miners in Virginia City. Giving up on their hopes in the gold rush, the three men decided to build a town in the fertile farmland of the Gallatin Valley. He built his home just north of Main Street, marking one of the first homes in Bozeman.

 

Rouse Avenue

Daniel Elliott Rouse was a traveler and farmer who lived in and helped establish settlements all over the United States. He moved to the Gallatin Valley in 1862, where he met John Bozeman and William Beall. Mr. Rouse helped build the first cabins and hotels in 1864.

 

Alderson Street

William White Alderson contributed a lot to the success of the town. He helped build a Methodist Church, hauled in logs for the town’s first school, started a dairy herd, served as an agent with the Sioux tribe, and became one of the first members of Bozeman’s municipal council.

 

Babcock Street

Carpenter William H. Babcock made the long journey to Bozeman from San Francisco in 1864. As an architect, he oversaw the construction of the Bozeman Opera House in 1888. Mr. Babcock became a rich man in Bozeman. He built a mansion known as “the Castle” on North Church Avenue and Davis Street, which is now long gone.

 

Black Avenue

This road was named after a successful businessman in Bozeman, Leander Black. Straight from Kentucky, he partnered with Achilles Lamme from Missouri to open a general store, competing with Lester Willson’s general store on the north-side of the street. With three other partners, Mr. Black expanded his business by opening the First National Bank of Bozeman in 1872.

 

Durston Road

Durston Road was named after an iconic Montana newspaper editor, John Durston. He was a highly educated man with a degree from Yale and a doctorate in Philosophy from the Heidelberg University. In 1887, Mr. Durston moved to Anaconda, Montana. In 1889, he became editor of the Anaconda Standard. After leaving the Anaconda Standard in 1912, he established the Butte Daily Post in 1913. Although he didn’t live in Bozeman, he invested in Bozeman real estate, and presumably owned a home on what is now Durston Road.

 

Story Street

Nelson Story had better luck in the gold rush than Mr. Bozeman and the other founders, making a fortune in Virginia City. With his riches, he bought approximately 1000 head of Texas Longhorns and took a big risk in the first major cattle drive through dangerous Indian territory from Texas to Montana. Mr. Story became Bozeman’s first millionaire and built the first Story Mansion on Main Street in Bozeman, then later built a second Story Mansion on the corner of Willson and College for his son, T. Byron Story. He also owned one of Bozeman’s first banks and flour mill, and donated land to launch the Montana Agricultural College.

 

Wilson Avenue

Lester Willson served in the Union Army during the Civil War. He rose through the rankings after enlisting as a private in 1861, reaching the rank of colonel by 1865. He was known for his “gallant and meritorious services under General Sherman, resulting in the fall of Atlanta, Georgia.”

In 1867, he left New York to take on a business venture in Bozeman, opening Bozeman’s first general store on 204 E. Main Street. He lived a long, fulfilling life, dying at age 79 in 1919. The community showed their respect for Willson by honoring him with the largest funeral the town had ever seen. Central Avenue was then renamed Willson Avenue in his honor.

 

The city of Bozeman had grown and prospered, becoming a major city of Montana with a population of 8,500 by 1910.

 

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Related Article:

How Did The City of “Bozeman” Get Its Name?

 

Sources:

About The Anaconda standard. (Anaconda, Mont.) 1889-1970

Lester S. Willson

John H. Durston, B. 1858, Syracuse, NY> 1887 MT – BIO

“Nelson Story”

Street names keep Bozeman’s colorful history alive

How Did The City of "Bozeman" Get Its Name?

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

 

The town of Bozeman was named after the man who made the Bozeman Trail, John Bozeman. Mr. Bozeman took part in the gold rush and traveled west from the mines in Colorado to mines in Deer Lodge, Montana, leaving his wife and children behind. Having failed in his quest for gold, he decided to take on a different venture—trail blazing. 

With help from his friend, John Jacobs, he created the Bozeman Trail in 1863 as a shortcut for gold miners traveling west from the Oregon Trail in Wyoming to Virginia City, Montana, a historic gold mining town.

Admiring the beauty of the Gallatin Valley at “the gate of the mountains,” John Bozeman settled in what came to be the town of Bozeman in 1864. Being near the trail, the town was able to flourish and grow as more travelers, gold miners, and businessmen eventually settled here.  

Only several years after he established the town in his name, John Bozeman was found murdered by the Yellowstone River in April 1867. While the partner he was traveling with, Thomas Cover, claims they were attacked by the Blackfeet Indians, historians suspect that Cover himself may be the murder culprit as a jealous husband—Mr. Bozeman was known to be a bit of a “ladies’ man.” 

Interestingly, a new suspect was found later after a rumor was spread by Stan Stephans, a retired farmer and rancher from the Crow reservation, that a henchman was hired to kill Mr. Bozeman. Stan shared a story passed down in his family that Tom Kent, a former cattle wrangler for the richest man in Bozeman, Nelson Story, once told the Stephans family that he killed John Bozeman on behalf of Mr. Story. However, there is still no physical evidence to prove who the true killer was.

Source:

John M. Bozeman” by The Editors of Encyclopaedia Britannica

Historians find new suspect in John Bozeman murder mystery” by Gail Schontzler

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