Bozeman Montana Real Estate Information Archive

Blog

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 350

5 Tips to Help Your Home Sell in the Winter

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

True or false- the best time to sell your home is typically during the spring and summer months— true. However, this doesn’t mean that you can’t sell during the winter and still get a great price.

If you’re considering selling this winter, here are several tips to help you prepare your home:

  • Snow removal: In order to set foot inside your home, buyers have to get there first. Shovel the snow and use salt to melt any ice patches, and ensure that the path to the lockbox (if you’re using one) is clear for agents.
  • Curb appeal still matters: Even though people won’t be spending much time outside the home for several months yet, it’s still important to maintain the exterior— clean out the gutters and keep trees and shrubs trimmed to help buyers envision what your home will look like during warmer months.
  • Set the scene: Create a cozy feeling during showings— add blankets to the couch, light some candles and use tasteful Christmas décor if selling during the holidays. If you have a fireplace, use it to showcase both its ability to warm up a room and its added aesthetic to your home.
  • Light it up: Winter has a tendency to remove a lot of natural light. To combat this, open window treatments during the day and utilize lightbulbs and candles to create as much lighting as possible.
  • Keep on eye on the weather: Be prepared for delays due to bad weather— showings, inspections and even document transmissions can be delayed if a winter storm rolls in. 


Sometimes homes sell for more during the snowy months because there is less inventory to choose from, although the amount of time to sell is dependent on weather, which in turn is dependent on the number of showings you’ll get. Even though there are fewer buyers during the winter months, the buyers that ARE looking tend to be more motivated. While there are benefits to selling during the spring and summer, there are also benefits to selling during the winter as well. 


Related Articles:

6 Things to Do Before You Take That Vacation

5 Areas to Focus On: How to Increase Your Home's Resale Value

Top Home Improvement Projects That Sell 

Home Prices and Growth: What’s Going On?

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

What Does Growth Look Like Around the U.S.?

It comes as no surprise to many of us that owning a home can be an expensive venture. Factor in HOA fees, interior appliances/materials, miscellaneous maintenance costs and everything in between, and it’s easy to see why being a homeowner can appear to be daunting to some.

Although home prices grew 5.6% last year, this is only determined when comparing dollars to dollars. If this statistic is adjusted for inflation, this increase is still actually 15% below the high that occurred in 2006. Of the country’s 100 largest metro areas, only 41 grew to new peaks, even though 97 of these 100 metro areas did see overall home price growth. Overall, housing markets on both the West and East coasts have experienced inflation-adjusted home price increases of more than 40% in the last 16 years, while markets in the Midwest and South have generally experienced decreases.

However, growth has not been the same across all income levels. After Harvard researchers collected data for more than 9,000 ZIP codes across the country, most home prices in all income brackets were LOWER than their pre-2006 peaks. Here’s the breakdown:

  • Low-income areas: 13.7% lower
  • Moderate-income areas: 6.5% lower
  • High-income areas: 3.3% lower

Because of the post-recession change in home prices, many homeowners were able to emerge from underwater, a term indicating that the value of a home is below or under its mortgage amount. In 2011, the number of underwater homeowners topped out at 12.1 million; by the end of 2016, that number was down to 3.2 million.

                   

Source: PalmBeachPost.com

What About Growth in and Around Bozeman?

Bozeman remains one of the fastest growing small towns in the country, with a population growth rate of 4.6%. Home prices across the state currently exceed pre-2006 levels by 10%.

When comparing median sales prices between Bozeman, Belgrade and other Bozeman areas, home prices are still steadily on the rise in all 3 areas.

 

Median Sales Prices (2011-2017)

This data was pulled Big Sky Country MLS for 2017. While we attempt to provide reliable, useful information, we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, current or suitable for any particular purpose. Estimates are subject to change without notice.

 

Although median sales prices are continually rising, the good news is that the median sale price is often lower than the median original asking price: 

This data was pulled Big Sky Country MLS for 2017. While we attempt to provide reliable, useful information, we cannot guarantee that the information is accurate, current or suitable for any particular purpose. Estimates are subject to change without notice.

 

As for the country as a whole, Freddie Mac predicts an overall home price increase of 4.9% in 2018. While that may seem like quite a jump, this prediction is still lower than the 6.3% growth we’ve seen so far this year.  Much like the prediction for 2017, 2018’s prediction also suggests continued economic growth of around 2%, steady job gains and relatively low mortgage rates. 


Related Articles:

Montana May Soon Be the New Silicon Valley

Gallatin County Leads Montana's Economy

Red Flags in the Real Estate Market

Long-Debated Black-Olive Project Gets Approved By City Commissioners

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

In September of 2016, the Black-Olive project was first presented to Bozeman City Commissioners as a 5-story building that would feature 56 apartments, as well as commercial business space on the ground floor and 37 on-site parking spaces. Many neighboring residents spoke out at both public meetings and on Facebook’s “Save Bozeman” page to express their concerns that the contemporary building would ruin Bozeman’s small-town charm and negatively impact street parking.

On April 11th of this year, this proposal was denied with a 4-1 vote, although it was stated that developer Andy Holloran intended to modify the design and resubmit his proposal for later review. Fast forward to last week— the Black-Olive development was APPROVED after more than a year of discussions, meetings and revised design plans, ironically with a 4-1 vote. The project will include demolition of the two-story building currently located at 202 S. Black Ave.

What Else?

The new design has been modified to feature 66 bedrooms within 47 apartments, while providing 40 parking spaces for those residents.  Although some commissioners and citizens were still against the project, stating that the building was too big and that parking constraints were already an issue, others disagreed. Commissioners I-Ho Pomeroy and Jeff Krauss support the idea of creating more housing opportunities downtown, which would include growth upward instead of outward.

What Now?

Although the project has been approved, Holloran will be required to make minor changes to the building’s top floor to scale back its elevation. After finishing the design to accommodate this amendment and obtaining both a building and demolition permit, Holloran expects to break ground sometime this spring. 

Future Location of Black-Olive Project

New Short-Term Rental Rules Adopted in Bozeman City Limits

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Bozeman City Commissioners adopted an ordinance on September 11th that includes new rules and regulations for the estimated 500-550 short-term rentals in Bozeman through platforms including Airbnb, VRBO and Homeaway. A short-term rental (STR) is defined as the rental of rooms or dwellings to paying guests anywhere from 1 to 29 days.

What’s the Gist?

This ordinance was adopted with a 3-2 vote by city commissioners—commissioners also passed the new fees that homeowners will pay in order to continue using their property as an STR. There is now an annual $250 registration fee, in addition to a one-time fire inspection fee of $225. In addition, some homeowners may find themselves paying an administrative conditional use permit of $1,508. Commissioner Chris Mehl states that there may be adjustments to these fees in the future, as the city commissioners will have the chance to look at and assess the fees every year.

What Else?

The new fees will be used to balance the program’s cost— they will cover resources needed to process applications, respond to complaints, monitor regulations and inspect rentals. Many older homes that are being used as short-term rentals do not have the same fire-safety features that newer homes have.

While some are concerned that the new mandatory fees will have a negative impact on homeowners who use their properties as short-term rentals in order to generate additional income, Mayor Carson Taylor supports the fee increases because they are important to overall public safety.

Additionally, the new ordinance will forbid STRs that aren’t owner-occupied at any time within Bozeman’s residential districts. In this case, owner-occupied indicates that the owner occupies the dwelling for more than 50% of the calendar year. People who have been operating in these areas prior to January 1st will have the option to be grandfathered in.

When Does This All Start?

These rules will go into effect starting December 1st, and once the ordinance is passed (30 days from September 11th), homeowners will be given a 60-day grace period to meet compliance.

What makes Bozeman both unique and a desirable place to live all comes down to quality—quality of the community, quality of housing and ultimately the quality of the people who live and work here. The intended purpose of this ordinance, while seen as frustrating and expensive to some homeowners, may help contribute to the quality of life that is so valued here in Bozeman, and continue to make living and visiting here so enjoyable.

6 Things To Do Before You Take That Vacation

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Summer is coming to a close, but that doesn’t mean that vacation time is over. Did you know that August is the second most popular month of the year to travel? With 36% of respondents vacationing this month, it’s a good idea to prepare your home to be unoccupied for days or weeks at a time.

There are many precautions you can take to ensure your home stays safe while you’re away. Here are a few tips to help reduce the risks:

  • Only 17% of homes in America have a home security system, and homes without one are three times as likely to be burglarized. While these systems are not cheap, they are a wise investment and can save you a headache and a lot of money later down the road.​​
  • Putting a hold on your mail and newspaper for the duration of your time away will make it look as though you are home, or at the very least, that someone is stopping by your house regularly to collect the mail.​​
  • This may seem like an obvious one, but is easy to overlook while packing and running last minute errands before you leave town. Lock all windows and doors and once you’ve locked them, double-check just to be sure.​​
  • We’ve all been told at one point or another to put our lights on a timer while on vacation, but smart bulbs like these can be programmed through your smartphone and controlled from wherever you are. It may also be a good idea to switch up the times that you activate the lights every day to further create the illusion that someone is home.​​
  • It may seem silly to water the plants, clean up the yard and mow the grass before leaving on vacation, but think about it– a home with a tidy yard implies that the home is occupied, and is more likely to deter a burglar.
  • You never know when a power surge will happen, so why take the risk while you’re away? Disconnect any electronics that don’t need to stay plugged in, such as the TV, your laptop, a hair dryer, etc.

These are just a few ideas to get you thinking about security measures to take the next time you leave for vacation and leave your empty house behind– after all, a vacation is intended to be relaxing, so don’t stress out!


Related articles: 

5 Areas to Focus On: How to Increase Your Home's Resale Value

Looking To Sell? 5 Projects to Improve Your Curb Appeal

Top Home Improvement Projects That Sell

Big Sky Is Booming: But What About Affordable Housing?

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Big Sky Resort is the third largest ski resort in America and attracts 500,000 skiers annually. After announcing a deal with CrossHarbor Capital Partners to merge Moonlight Basin into Big Sky Resort in 2013, the resort now boasts an impressive 5,800 acres of public skiing, with an additional 2,200 acres available to Yellowstone Club members, yet still remains fairly undiscovered. Although a whopping one million cars drive past Big Sky every year, most of that traffic is Yellowstone National Park bound.

The Housing Issue

Between now and 2025, the resort plans on spending $150 million on improvements. The community of Big Sky currently has a population of 2,500 and in recent years has added numerous shops and restaurants, in addition to a movie theater and a full-service grocery store in 2014. The following year, Big Sky Medical Center started offering emergency services and inpatient care.

Although the community is steadily growing and the resort itself has expanded, there is one issue that still raises concern— most of Big Sky’s workforce commutes to work due to the lack of affordable housing available to employees. Recent data shows that Big Sky is short between 900 and 1,200 units, and that roughly 83% of the entire workforce leaves at the end of the day to begin their commute back to Bozeman and other surrounding areas. (image credit: explorebigsky.com)

Is There a Plan?

David Fowler is an architect who has been working on this issue since 2013. He states that the most important thing to do in order to begin solving this problem and creating more affordable housing is the establishment of an organization to begin accepting donations in order to offset land costs. There is a plan in the works that includes the construction of an 18-condo development on a 4.14-acre parcel known as Sweetgrass Hills in the Town Center, but critics argue that 18 condos don’t count for much when the housing shortage is as high as it is.

Additionally, Lone Mountain Land Company (LMLC) is developing two properties in the Town Center that will be targeted for Yellowstone Club, Moonlight and Spanish Peaks employees. One building will contain 16 units (completion estimated at approximately one year) and the other will hold 32 units. Both buildings will likely be rental properties.

While these plans may not begin to take place in the immediate future, the resort plans on moving forward with its $150 million improvements. Last year two new high-speed chairlifts were added to the mountain, one of which has heated seats and plexiglass bubbles to shield passengers from the elements. A number of new restaurants are expected to be opening soon as well. Overall, Stephen Kircher (president of Boyne Resorts’ operations, of which Big Sky Resort is a part) says that both of these projects are early steps in a 10-year plan to add a European experience to the resort. The addition of more real estate and improved services in the Town Center will help his vision become a reality, though it may be several years down the road before we see any significant changes to the area. 

 

5 Areas to Focus On: How to Increase Your Home’s Resale Value

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

It’s the hottest time of year, and with that comes the hottest selling season. When aiming to sell, keep in mind that the littlest changes can often have the largest impact when trying to increase the resale value of your home. Here are a few ideas to get you started on preparing your home to sell this summer, while also getting a great price for it:

  1. Declutter

It is important to keep in mind that some of the changes you will be making may not suit your personal preferences and tastes— that’s okay! Packing away family photos and sports memorabilia will be less distracting during showings. Keep in mind that many buyers cannot visualize a space, and if you have too much “stuff”, this can overwhelm them and leave them with a negative impression of your home.

  1. Spruce up the bathrooms

42% of real estate professionals surveyed by Consumer Reports agree that bathrooms are one of the most important rooms in a home to have in good condition. You can invest as much or as little as you want into renovations and updates, but simple projects such as re-grouting the tile or replacing an old toilet could give you a potential increase in asking price of up to 3%.

  1. Update the kitchen

Millennials currently make up 34% of all homebuyers, and a “modern/updated kitchen” is one of their top criteria when considering which home to purchase. New or repainted cabinets, stainless steel appliances and a fresh coat of paint can completely transform your kitchen and potentially add between 3 and 7% to the asking price.

  1. Give the walls some TLC

Walls should be a backdrop rather than a focal point when trying to sell. Certain colors work better in some rooms than others and may have an impact on selling price. Homes with warm neutrals such as wheat yellow in the kitchen sell for $1,360 more on average. Comparatively, neutrals such as grey-beige win in the living room, adding an average of $1,104 to the selling price.

  1. Remember the curb appeal

The exterior of your home can easily be neglected when renovating the inside, but some potential buyers won’t even make it through the front door if they aren’t impressed with the outside. Basic landscaping, installing outdoor lighting and planting a few flowers can make a world of difference, and may bump up the asking price by up to 5%.  New roofs are also a huge bonus, as it shows buyers that the home has been cared for, and 31% of real estate professionals agree that the roof is an important part of the home to have in good condition.

In order to attract buyers and leave them with a positive and memorable impression, it’s important to spend a little time spicing up your home without going overboard. Researching which projects will suit your home best before spending money on unnecessary renovations will help to ensure that you’re only putting in what you’ll get out when offers start rolling in. 


Related Articles:

Looking to Sell? 5 Projects to Improve Your Curb Appeal

Top Home Improvement Projects That Sell

Expert Tips for Spring Cleaning: Improve Energy Efficiency and Air Quality of Your Home

Bozeman Montana Becomes Hot Spot for High Tech Companies

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

The high-tech industry is thriving in Montana, growing at a rate seven times faster than other sectors.

Montana’s high-tech companies are expecting to add roughly 1,000 new jobs this year, paying an average salary of $60,000—more than double the median annual income in Montana.   

The Montana High Tech Business Alliance counted a total of 546 tech companies in Montana as of December 20, 2016. Yet the organization says there are even more companies unaccounted for, as smaller companies may be hiding in remote business parks and second-floor offices without signage.

Much of the attention seems to be focused around the Universities. With Montana State University pumping out more qualified talent each year, as FICO Chief Executive Officer Will Lansing says, “the talent pool in this part of Montana has attracted dozens of leading technology firms.”

High Density of High Growth, High-Tech Companies

He wasn’t kidding either. Here’s a list of some of the most successful high-growth technology companies in Bozeman, Montana.

Ascent Vision, an aerospace technology company based in Bozeman, grew from two people to a team of 50 and made millions within just the first year of operation in 2013. Last year, the company began construction of a new 30,000 sq. ft. facility by Belgrade. It will be interesting to see how this company will grow with the rising demand for sensors in UAVs, counter UAS systems, self-driving cars, and ground based military applications.

Elixiter, a marketing services firm, averaged an astounding 100 percent growth rate year over year, landing on the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in 2016. Having such rapid and unanticipated expansion, the company relocated four times in four years, finally settling on the northeast side of Bozeman.

FICO, a data analytics company for credit rating services, plans to add a new location in downtown Bozeman, and hire 50 new employees within the next 18 months. The company employs roughly 3,000 around the world, and is a recognized leader in analytic technology. FICO was ranked #31 among the Top Technology Providers in financial services ​by American Banker and BAI, and was also named to the Analytics 50 by Drexel University and CIO.com.

Foundant Technologies, is a “software-as-a-service” company in Bozeman that develops grant and scholarship management software, was also on the Inc. 5,000 list of fastest growing companies in 2016, but for the third consecutive year in a row.   

PrintingForLess.com (PFL), while technically located in Livingston, Montana, is close enough to give credit to the Bozeman area. PFL landed on the Inc. 500 list of fastest growing companies for three consecutive years, and appeared on CNBC, Wall Street Journal, and the New York Times for having innovative HR policies. Having established the first website for commercial printing, PFL has made significant progress since it was founded in 1996. It evolved from a traditional print shop into a sophisticated marketing technology company. It’s expecting significant growth in 2017 with its new software, named “Tactile Marketing Automation.”

Quiq, a firm that develops text messaging software for customer service, scored a $6.5 million investment last year—a great start after just being established in October 2015. Company CEO Mike Myer, a former employee of RightNow Technologies before it sold to Oracle for $1.8 billion, says it was an easy decision to choose to start this business in Bozeman. He says “Montana is a great place to recruit up-and-coming people, and not just recruiting, but retention and loyalty.”

Wisetail, a learning management software (LMS) company in Bozeman, is an inspiring entrepreneurial example. Amidst the most recent housing crisis, company founder, Justin Bigart, started the company with the ambition to repay his debts, refusing to consider bankruptcy as an option. His hard work and determination certainly paid off. Wisetail ranked #32 in Outside Magazine’s 100 Best Places to Work in 2016, named one of the 5,000 fastest growing companies in America by Inc., and one of Fortune Magazine’s 50 Best Small Businesses in America.  


Related Articles:

Bozeman Invests Millions in More Parks and Trails

 

Bozeman Ramps Up Development This Spring

 

A Skeptic Outlook for $125 Million Proposal for Two Bozeman High Schools

The Cost of Improving Bozeman's Transportation Infrastructure

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

It’s great to see Bozeman, Montana grow and prosper as a thriving community, but there’s always a catch to population growth—traffic.

The city expects that by 2040, Gallatin County will have 77,000 new residents, 36,000 housing units, along with 48,000 new jobs. Even if all of Bozeman’s road projects on its 5-year plan are completed, the city projects that traffic will still overcrowd major streets like Huffine, College, Griffin, 19th and 11th Avenue

The Cost of Adding Traffic Capacity

The city is well-aware of the challenge ahead to accommodate for Bozeman’s rapid growth, and they found that the cost would be staggering. According to actual construction bids, a standard two-lane road in Bozeman, with curbs, bike lanes and sidewalks, costs about $2.2 million per mile. Four lane roads are more than double the cost, at roughly $5 million per mile.

Upgraded intersections are also incredibly expensive. A large traffic signal was estimated to cost about $2.4 million, and a roundabout would cost about $2.9 million.

If the city follows through with every project that it has planned for Bozeman for over next 25 years, the total cost would amount to an estimated $380 million. This plan includes 58 major street network upgrades ($174 million), more than 42 miles of new roads ($129 million), and 53 “system management” projects, which mostly includes intersection upgrades ($77 million).

How Can We Mitigate These Costs?

With such a high price tag for new roads and intersections, it’s understandable that the city is so conservative about starting new construction projects. Fortunately, with the exception of Rouse Avenue north of Peach Street and Kagy Boulevard between 19th and Seventh, Bozeman’s streets are still big enough to handle their current traffic volumes, according to the engineers working on the plan.

To minimize the need to sacrifice hard-earned tax-payer dollars, the city encourages drivers to use alternative transportation options.

One option, of course, is to have more commuters walk or ride a bike. However, while this may work for the summer months (which wouldn’t help much because school is out for summer anyways), we wouldn’t see many people enduring the brunt of winter just to get to work or school.

Another more practical idea is to break up the typical 9 to 5 work schedule. City planners are currently working with researchers at the Western Transportation Institute (an affiliate of Montana State University) to coordinate alternating work schedules with employers in attempt to calm the intensity of rush hour traffic.

For those that simply have no other option, they can try to plan a route around the most congested intersections. For your reference, below are some the most overloaded intersections to avoid:

  • Baxter and Davis
  • Babcock and Ferguson
  • Kagy and Seventh
  • Kagy and Sourdough

Here are also several intersections that are most prone to crashes:

  • Valley Center Spur and Frontage Road
  • 19th Avenue and Goldenstein
  • Willson and Peach

 

Follow us on Facebook, or sign up for our monthly newsletter to receive exclusive information about the housing market, real estate tips and advice, and local news and development.


Related Articles:

What is Parking Worth in Downtown Bozeman?

 

A Skeptic Outlook for $125 Million Proposal for Two Bozeman High Schools

 

Another Mid-Rise Building Approved for Bozeman

Bozeman Ramps Up Development This Spring

by Hart Real Estate Solutions

Looks like this spring is going to be a busy season for Bozeman, Montana. Aside from the many new residential homes and apartment buildings sprouting up around town, numerous new businesses are opening soon and development projects are breaking ground.

Here is a quick snap shot of some of the new development happening now in Bozeman.   

Restaurants

There are several new restaurants coming to town, and most are opening around the same time in April. Here are a few of them.  

The M Donut Factorylocated on Main Street, is set for a slow opening in April, and then a grand opening in June. The owner, a retired cop from California, is excited to share his love for donuts with Bozeman. He plans to offer all traditional doughnuts at first, then specialties, and eventually some gluten-free and vegan options. 

The M Donut Factory

Sweet Peaks Ice Cream will be opening in April, replacing the old Rockford Coffee shop on Seventh Avenue and Main Street. The ice cream shop will offer more than a dozen flavors, ranging from honey cinnamon to Madagascar vanilla, and homemade waffle cones.

Sweet Peaks Ice Cream

Stuffed Crepes and Waffles will be bringing a little piece of France to Bozeman on downtown Main Street, next to the Country Bookshelf. Sometime in April, this crepe and waffle joint will offer both authentic and non-traditional crepes and waffles, smoothies, ice-cream, and delicious parfaits.

Sidewinders is set to open on June 1st on Bozeman’s west side, off Huffine Lane. This family-owned and operated American grill will feature 8,000 square feet, with rooftop seating, a large bar, and even an arcade! The restaurant is popular for its chicken pot pies, French onion soups, and stuffed pretzels, while also serving burgers and steaks. The best part about this place? — a selection of more than 70 draft beers!

Taco del Sol will be catering to Four Corner’s growing appetite in April with a second location closer to home. On Shedhorn Drive, in the old Frugal Frame Shop, this new shop will be much smaller than the one on Main Street, with under 1,000 square feet floor space. The owner intends to cater to the “summer crowd” that passes through Four Corner’s, offering to-go cold wraps, snacks, bars and fruit in addition to its regular tacos and burritos.

Commercial Development

There are two new commercial development projects set for Bozeman, with one underway right now.

#1 A project has just started to turn 20-acres of the Opportunity Subdivision (south of Target and the City Brew on North 19th Avenue) into 6 developed lots—5 will be for shops and businesses, and 1 will be residential. Right now, construction of two roads is underway for this development, named Kimberwike and Max streets. The plan does not specify what the businesses and tenants will be for the commercial lots.

#2  There is also a 19-acre development project in the works for the Ferguson Farm development. The plan includes yet another restaurant and a 22,000-square-foot multi-use space that will host about nine businesses, including anything from brew pubs to coffee shops, and eventually a lodge and grocery. The project is planned to start sometime this summer.  

Office Buildings

Two new office buildings are being built across from each other on the intersection of 19th Avenue and College Street.

On the northwest corner, the old house currently sitting on the lot will be torn down to make way for a 17,000-square-foot commercial building. According to the planning documents, this space will be used for offices.

On the northeast corner, next to the Montana Skin Cancer and Dermatology Center, Excel Physical Therapy is constructing a two-story, 8,500 square foot building that the company plans to relocate to. The top floor will be rented out to a separate business.

More to Come

As a rapidly growing and thriving community, there is much more to come for Bozeman. The city has been attracting a lot of attention for its entrepreneurial activity and business success, making-up another great reason to move here than for just its beautiful scenery, outdoor recreation, and small-town charm. It will be exciting to see what the high-tech sector brings our town in the years to come.

Follow us on Facebook, or sign up for our monthly newsletter to receive exclusive information about the housing market, real estate tips and advice, and local news and development.


Related Articles:

A Skeptic Outlook for $125 Million Proposal for Two Bozeman High Schools

 

Another Mid-Rise Building Approved for Bozeman

 

What is Parking Worth in Downtown Bozeman?

Displaying blog entries 1-10 of 350

Syndication

Categories

Archives